Take a regular walk in the park and discover the \'healthier you\'

Investing in the building and development of public parks proves to be beneficial for the physical fitness of citizens in the locality - according to a recent research by scientists at the Penn State University.

That brisk walk is excellent to improve your physical fitness and the overall health is known for long. Walking has been regarded as the ‘good for all ages’ exercise that has myriad range of health benefits including maintaining normal blood pressure, reducing the risk of diabetes, lowering the bad cholesterol levels, raising the level of good cholesterol and keeping the weight checked. Apart from these benefits, this simple and safe form of exercise also brings in positivity in your lifestyle and improves your mood.

A recent study by the experts of leisure studies, recreation and parks management has revealed that investing in public parks yields number of health benefits apart from being an add-on to the public health care system. Use of parks is an addictive practice and it becomes a part of people’s life almost instantly. Findings of the research have strong implications that the investments in parks and recreational services have a striking impact on the overall health and physical fitness of the residents of areas surrounding the public park. Researchers believe that there is a substantial association of the amount of money spent in providing such services with the amount of physical activity that the residents of the area indulge in. A report prepared as a part of the study suggested that each additional 10 US dollars spent per person in providing public facilities like park and recreational services, increase the opportunities for more energetic exercises for girls and leads to improved strength-building in both the genders. Researchers strongly put forward their point by saying that investing in public parks is far better than investing in health clubs since the clubs hardly provide anything for such small an amount.

Reference:
A recent study by Geof Godbey, professor emeritus of leisure studies, and Andrew Mowen, associate professor of recreation and parks management.

Disclaimer: This article is written by a non-medical professional.

Date: 
Monday, February 14, 2011